Q: WHAT IS THE OSTEOPATHIC APPROACH?

For more than a century, osteopathic physicians have built a tradition of bringing health care to where it is needed most: DOs combine today's medical technology with their ears to listen caringly to their patients, with their eyes to see each patient as a whole person, and with their hands to diagnose and treat patients for injury and illness. 

Q: WHAT IS A DO?

Students entering both DO and MD medical colleges typically have already completed four-year bachelor's degrees with an emphasis on scientific courses. While DOs and MDs have many things in common, osteopathic medicine is a parallel branch of American medicine with a distinct philosophy and approach to patient care. DOs can bring an extra dimension to your health care through their unique skills.  For more than a century, osteopathic physicians have built a tradition of bringing health care to where it is needed most:DOs combine today's medical technology with their ears to listen caringly to their patients, with their eyes to see each patient as a whole person, and with their hands to diagnose and treat patients for injury and illness.

Q: WHAT ARE THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF REgenerative injections?

A: Regenerative injections are not a band aide or a “quick fix” but rather a long-lasting and potentially permanent reparative process if the area is not overused or re-injured after the treatment series, and especially if the patient commits to a rehabilitative program. The healing process is gradual and progressive, initially subtle during the early phases but usually significant and dramatic by the completion of treatment. More endurance, less pain, and better function will continue to be noticed over time.

Q: HOW Are regenerative injections ADMINISTERED?

A: Typically, regenerative injections are performed by injecting various soft tissue structures including ligaments and ligamentous joint capsules throughout the body. Traditionally, regenerative injections are to be injected into structures based on gross anatomic landmarks (also known as “blind injections” meaning without any image guidance). However, with the use of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound (MSKUS) for guided injections, more regenerative injections are being performed under MSKUS although not always necessary.

Q: WHAT IS A SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST?

A: A physician with significant specialized training in both the treatment and prevention of illness and injury. The Sports Medicine Specialist helps patients maximize function and minimize disability and time away from sports, hobby, work, or school. He or she is a physician who:

• Is board certified in Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, or Physical Medicine/ Rehabilitation.

• Has obtained one to two years of additional training in Sports Medicine through one of the accredited Fellowship (subspecialty) Programs in Sports Medicine.

• Has passed a national Sports Medicine certification examination allowing them to hold a Certificate of Added Qualification in Sports Medicine.

• Further adds to their expertise through participation in continuing medical education activities and recertification via re-examination every ten years. This rigorous process was instituted to distinguish certified Sports Medicine Specialists from other physicians without specialized training.

• Is a leader of the Sports Medicine team, which also may include specialty physicians and surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists, coaches, other personnel, and the athlete.

Q: DO SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALISTS ONLY TREAT COMPETITIVE ATHLETES?

A: No. Sports Medicine Specialists are ideal physicians for the non-athlete as well, and are excellent resources for the individual who wishes to become active or begin an exercise program. For the “weekend warrior” or “industrial athlete” who experiences an injury, the same expertise used for the competitive athlete can be applied to return the individual as quickly as possible to full function.

Q: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST AND AN ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON?

A: Both are well trained in musculoskeletal medicine. Sports Medicine Specialists specialize in the non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. Orthopedic surgeons are also trained in the operative treatment of these conditions. However, approximately 90% of all sports injuries are non-surgical. The Sports Medicine Specialist can maximize non-operative treatment, guide appropriate referrals to physical and occupational therapies, and if necessary expedite a surgical referral.